Data breaches have become so common that they are no longer news. Gartner predicts,  “as more companies look to benefit from data, there will be an inevitable increase in data use and sharing missteps.” However, organizations that have a culture of ethics for data use will be better prepared to avoid such mistakes, and to handle them well if they do occur. Read on to learn how your company can have not just a data protection plan, but a culture that revolves around protecting the personal data of your customers. 

 

Protecting Your Business and Your Customer’s Data

 

In spite of the occurrence of data breaches, your company can be protected. If you haven’t already done so, you might draw up a data-protection plan that will address what to do in case of a breach. Ideally your organization will already have technology in place to prevent data breaches–tools such as updated antivirus and anti-malware definitions and network monitoring, for instance. Hopefully, there is also a culture of ethics around use of customer information, including transparency with customers about what is done to protect their personal data. 

 

Countries and entire regions, such as Australia and Europe, have put legislation into effect to protect customers. Europe’s GDPR mandates a notification within 72 hours of a data breach. Australia’s Consumer Data Right gives its citizens the right to delete information that is no longer needed, as well as stopping data collection at any time While the U.S. has no nationwide law, individual states have their own regulations. For example, California gives their residents certain rights under the California Consumer Privacy Act, such as the right to opt out of having their data sold.  The CCPA also sets forth steep monetary penalties for failing to protect customer information. Businesses are required, among other things, to have a conspicuous link for customers to click in order to opt out of having their personal information used. Regulations may vary, but their intent–the protection of data–is similar. 

 

Using Legislation as a Data Protection Template

 

Even in areas without this legislation yet in place, businesses can develop a robust plan based on such standards. Topics to address in this plan can include what your company will do in the event of a data breach, and whether data will be shared with third-party vendors. One task for companies is to inventory their vendors; smaller vendors might not have rigorous rules for handling data. 

 

To protect your company from the consequences of a data breach is vital. To develop a plan for protecting your customers’ data, or to fine-tune one you already have, contact Netgain Networks at 855-667-2364 today.